DIY-DMU Podcast 017 International Community Media Expo

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May 092018
 
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Today’s podcast was recorded as part of the first DMU International Community Media Expo. Sitting around the table was Julian, Kiaran, Ineke, Gerhart and myself. We chatted about the role and the importance of community media and what we need to learn to make our own media.

DIY-DMU Podcast 016 ART-AI Festival

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May 022018
 
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This week’s DIY-DMU Podcast was recorded at the Highcross Centre in Leicester, where young people were learning about the ART-AI Festival, and how Artificial Intelligence can be used creatively and artistically. John Coster and I chatted with Proffessor Tracy Harwood, from De Montfort University’s Institute of Creative Technology, and with some of her colleagues who are supporting the festival. We also had a chance to talk with some of the students and their teacher about how creative AI applications are able to help us learn and understand the world and technology in different ways.

Democratic Media Institutions

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May 022018
 

BBC Media Action is the charitable arm of the BBC that seeks to support communication development in developing nations around the world. James Deane is the Director of Policy and Research, and in his latest blog he asks if we need to rethink how we build media organsations and institutions that support democratic accountability around the world. Deane suggests that:

Access to information that people can trust, find relevant, that underpins informed democratic debate, and can hold power to account, will depend on the existence of media institutions, not just information networks. That remains the major challenge of media support. It is a challenge that we need fresh thinking to achieve.

I agree with Deane that this isn’t just about rolling-out large media corporations, or throwing open the communication floodgates to the market, and that we do need to undertake some careful thinking about what we build and put in place for the future. As Deane argues:

Media freedom and media sustainability indicators focus on whether media is free and sustainable and less on on whether they are valued, trusted or relevant to the populations of their societies, especially those outside an educated middle class. This is especially important at a time of digital and demographic transformation.

The challenge, from my perspective, is how do we harness the independent and distrubuted technologies in which we aggregate news and media content, in which ‘brands’ are no longer as importnat, but the need for trusted informants, guides and advocates is?

Trusting Community Reporting?

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May 012018
 

John Naughton writing in The Guardian makes a very powerful point about the need for trusted sources of information in developing communities. With the use of Facebook as a tool for promoting fake news, which has led to violence in Myanmar and Sri Lanka, Naughton suggests that:

We have woken up to Facebook’s pernicious role in western democratic politics and are beginning to think about ways of addressing that problem in our bailiwicks. To date, the ideas about regulation that have surfaced seem ineffectual and so the damage continues. But at least liberal democracies have some degree of immunity to the untruths disseminated by bad actors who exploit Facebook’s automated targeting systems – provided by a free press, parliamentary inquiries, independent judiciaries, public-service broadcasters, universities, professional bodies and so on.

However, as Naughton goes on to point out:

Other societies, particularly the developing countries now most assiduously targeted by Facebook, have few such institutions and it is there that the company has the capacity to wreak the most havoc.

The importance of trust in our civic and community media is crucial to promoting peace and reconciliation, but do we have the right tools to do this as independent media producers and communities? Large media organisations spend a lot of time promoting their ‘brand’ identity so that it can be trusted and relied upon, but this appraoch isn’t available to small, independent, volunteer-led community media groups.

Is there a way, then, perhaps with something like the Mozilla Open Badges project, which independently verified people’s learning, to independently verify the output of reporters across different media platforms, networks and communities?

Trust is the currency that holds society togehter, and when trust dies, our social order suffers. How can we build a new infrastructure that enables trust to be implicity validated in our media use, and what would the criteria be that would demonstrate that a reporter or a media producer is a trusted source? If Uber and Tripadvisor can do this, why can’t news organisations and social media corporations put some funding and development time into producing trust tokens for community reporters?

Documentary Media Month Podcast One

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Nov 012017
 
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Earlier this evening John Coster and I sat and had a chat about the role and importance of documentary media in a rapidly changing world. This year’s Documentary Media Month programme is available at the Doc Media site, with a wide range of events running during November in Leicester.

East Midlands Community Media Network

 Community Media, DIY-DMU, DMU, EMCMN, TECH1502, TECH2503, TECH3501  Comments Off on East Midlands Community Media Network
Oct 032017
 

I want to set up a Community Media Network for the East Midlands, that can be used to share information and advice about developing community media in the region. The aim of this project is to develop networking events, host regular podcasts discussions, list and share information about community media groups in the East Midlands, and promote ideas that support community development practices though community media.

I’ve set up a wiki page on the DMU Commons Wiki, and I will be adding content to the new CIVICRM database that we are introducing for the Community Media modules this year.

If anyone wants to help get this going, as an extra-curricula activity, or just because you are interested in the development of stronger voices in Leicester, then we will be meeting on Wednesday’s 5-7pm at the Doc Media Centre which is on Leicester’s Town Hall Square.

This is an open network, and we want to encourage lots of different people to help out and take part. If you want to find out more, then contact me at rwatson@dmu.ac.uk, or via Twitter @robwmedia.

CMA Conference 2017 Voices in a Changing World

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Sep 242017
 

This year’s Community Media Association conference went by in something of a blur! Held at The Station in Bristol, the conference had a theme of thinking about community media as an important movement for community development, civic participation and creative expression.

Helping to organise a conference means that you don’t really get to relax to enjoy the panel discussions and the breakout session, and because there was a lot packed-in to the conference, it meant that the CAM Council team had to stay on our toes in order to make sure everyone felt welcome, included and could get what they wanted from the sessions.

The Station is a great venue, and had the right feel of informality, technical capability and accessibility. Other venues might be slicker and more corporate, but The Station had the feel that it was a hub for community activities focused on supporting young people in Bristol.

My main job was to host a panel discussion at the start of the main session. I decided to approach it like I approach my podcasts, as an informal discussion in which we could open-up any issues that concerned the panel members. We started the session by playing a video of Ishmahil Blagrove who berated the media for their coverage of the Grenfell Tower tragedy (see video below).

I was worried that this would be quite controversial, but the passion and eloquence that Ishmahil shows in his critique of the exploitation of communities by corporate media got a round of applause from the room, and it propelled us into a stronger discussion of why community media is important.

The CMA Council has a very strong team at the moment, who are all committed to developing and leading on the changes that face community media, and are increasingly recognising that these changes can only come about it community media acts as a movement for change, and not just as a service sector for government or corporate media.

I’m exhausted this morning, after a couple of beers last night, so I’m going to snooze on the train and catch up with some reading and get back to Leicester and get myself ready for the coming week of new students at DMU.

 

CMA Conference Bristol 2017

 Community Media, DIY-DMU, DMU, EMCMN, TECH1502, TECH2503, TECH3501  Comments Off on CMA Conference Bristol 2017
Sep 222017
 

This is slightly ridiculous, but this is the first time that I’ve actually been to Bristol! I’m not very well traveled, so when it was decided to hold this year’s Community Media Association Conference at The Station in Bristol, it had the double benefit of being in a place that is on my list to mooch around.

Ujima Radio offered to host the conference this year, because the building that they are part of, The Station, has some excellent facilities and an inclusive approach to training, services and support, all under one roof, in the centre of the city.

So the job today is to set-up the conference room, to learn how use the sound desk and the projector, and to make sure that we have everything working so we can run the discussion sessions and the break-out sessions.

The theme of this year’s conference is Voices in a Changing World, because we want to broaden the debate about community media. In my view it is too easy to get bogged down in managerial talk of services sectors and economic development, and to miss the important issues that drive change, and the values that people feel and wish to express.

I’m looking forward to some vibrant debate, to learning from people who have experience pushing the boundaries of community media, capturing some interviews for a podcast, and taking lots of photos. As usual I’ll be Tweeting and posting on Instagram. I’m not sure what the hashtag is yet, so watch out and join in the discussion wherever you are.

Community Media – The Power of Self-Representation

 Community Media, Debate, EMCMN  Comments Off on Community Media – The Power of Self-Representation
Jun 282017
 

The horror of the Grenfell Tower fire has highlighted for us all the issue of social marginalisation and voice poverty. If you need evidence of how divided communities in this country are, the proof is staring at us in the form of the smouldering shell of a tower block that was once home to hundreds of families who had settled in London in the hope of building a better life.

But if people living in the richest borough in London are not being heard or understood, how many other people and communities up and down the United Kingdom are likewise not getting heard?

The shock of what has just taken place in London should be a worry for us all. Not just for what it says about fire regulation and social policy, but for what it says about communities that have important issues to talk about, and who want to contribute to the ongoing debates about what makes us stronger.

After years of vilification and whipped-up hatred by politicians and newspapers, often to suit narrow political or business interests, it has taken a disaster of this magnitude to see through the deception that being poor isn’t, and never has been, a free-ride.

The stark fact has come to the fore, that people and communities across the United Kingdom are seemingly powerless to act against entrenched local authority bureaucracy, especially when it is entwined with deregulated and unaccountable commercial business interests.

Having been excluded from national debates, vilified for their social differences, or worse, disregarded as legitimate citizens, the anger that is being expressed on the streets of Kensington and Chelsea is understandable. If you push down on people for long enough, eventually they will push back.

This means that the challenge of living together in harmony, in integrated communities, for the mutual benefit of all, is back on the agenda as the defining worry of our age. However, after almost a decade of austerity, the absence of practical support for shared social cooperation, which promotes understanding and mutual engagement, has meant that our communities are more divided and more disenchanted.

None of this is helped by the centralised, concentrated and narrow model of media regulation that we have in the UK, which is clearly not fit for the purpose of community self-representation. The market-based model of local media is letting us down.

Everywhere there has been a hollowing-out of local representation. Local newspapers are put together from press-releases in distant towns. Local radio stations regurgitate nostalgic chat and play-listed music that is a comfort blanket for some, but an irrelevance for many.

Social media is the disrupting influence in this process, as social media platforms are able to demonstrate a proliferation of voices, issues, creativity, obduracy, concern, and anger. Social media has given a platform for many different alternative voices to come forward, though this is a process that can work both ways.

The expression of consternation and indignation that is being voiced, however, is as likely to come from the right – with those who want to exclude marginalised communities and demonise them – as much as it comes from those on the left, who want to embrace and celebrate social differences.

The alternative to a trusted and responsive media, we are so often told, is to share our own news and ideas on social media. But this has also highlighted that many of our traditional media outlets, newspapers and broadcasters, have too much in common, and are chasing the same narrow expectations of shareholder value and profit.

The concentration of ownership of British media, in the hands of fewer and fewer multinational corporations, that are all chasing the same advertising revenues, means that audiences are only ever considered in ways that are constricted, homogenous and static, all to please their sponsors.

It’s frustrating then, that community media is seldom acknowledged as a practical and sustainable alternative to mainstream media. Especially as community media is well placed as a community movement that embraces diversity, self-expression and shared cultural understanding.

Had community media been able to provide a space for voices blocked by the mainstream media and political parties, then the simmering resentment that resulted in the Brexit vote might have found an outlet. Instead, the mainstream media where preoccupied by a wave of jingoistic nationalism that failed to pick-up on the experience of many people living in the left-behind communities who have not shared in the new prosperity offered to only a few by the free market.

Community media in the United Kingdom, however, is desperately underfunded and actively marginalised by speculative commercial interests. If young people and others are turning to extremism as they search for radical answers, because they can feel that they are part of something, then we need to invest in alternatives media spaces that cuts-off extremism and renews our sense of community as an active and enriching set of social practices.

In Germany, the Federal Agency for Civic Education gets federal funding in order to promote understanding of political issues, intensify awareness of democratic cultures, and promotes the political process as something that all citizens can participate in.

Clearly, work needs to be done so that communities are able to share information in responsible ways, be media literate, and learn to question what they are told. But it is only by investing in community-led solutions, that offer people a chance to learn about each other, founded on the ability to participate in the life of their neighbourhood, its civic life, that we are able to renew and strengthen our sense of community.

Community media is a movement of people who want to see change through locally empowered and self-determined voices that are accountable through local participation in media of all kinds. Community media is a movement of people who think globally, but act locally. Community media is a movement that calls for all parties aspiring to government to invest in social and civic spaces that they can cherish.

Community media is about recognising and supporting the right to speak out, about giving back control of media to local communities. Allowing communities to hold their representatives and administrators to account. Investing in support for high quality, grassroots journalism. Including young people in the democratic process. Valuing all voices, from all backgrounds and abilities. Demystify media and the structures built around it. Changing the broadcasting regulations to support wider debate is now essential.

Access to community media should be seen as a right, and not dismissed as a hobby or plaything. But community media can only contribute to the building of a better society if people have time to volunteer, and the resources to discuss, debate and question issues that are relevant to them.

By offering widespread community media opportunities everywhere, and for all people, it will be possible to reach people who are held at the margins, especially those who other media do not understand or cannot represent. Community media is about promoting access for everyone, regardless of age, gender, race, ability, income or any other factor.

This means maintaining the core principles of community radio, which means that there is an alternative media movement that is not run by the state, that is not for profit, which is locally owned and accountable, and which can lead the way in bringing about deeper social change. As media technologies change, such as community television, or small-scale digital radio, we have to ensure that communities have priority over narrow commercial interests.

Funding for community media has to be increased substantially. Ofcom presently gives £400,00 each year to support community radio in the UK, but the BBC spends ten times that on taxis each year. We need to establish flexible and dedicated funds for all types of community media projects, channels and groups, that support reasonable and fair payments for the services community media provide, through training programmes and the promotion of community development campaigns.

Investing in education and learning opportunities through and with community media means recognising community media’s contribution to our civic and social life. Celebrating and valuing the achievements of the community media movement in a way that cherishes the positive impact we can all have on the wellbeing of individuals and communities, is essential.

By working closely with government and community focussed partners it is possible to embed and secure new opportunities for community media participation. Being included in all important conversations about regulation, legislation and resource planning is essential.

Principally, this is about promoting the development and use of existing and emerging media platforms for sharing the creative work of communities. This is not just about mirroring the way that mainstream media works, but instead, it’s about how we understand and support the artistic and creative value of community media, in which we are able to provide physical and virtual spaces for communities to take creative risk and find their voice.

Those of us in the community media movement know there is a different way, and that ordinary people can collaborate, work together on independent platforms, that are owned and run by local communities. Community media has been quietly growing in the background across the United Kingdom, using alternative business models that are not driven solely by advertising, but that embrace the work and the vitality of social enterprises, that increase access, thereby earning money from training, running inclusive membership schemes, and much more.

Community media has been desperately underfunded. The community media movement has to fight for the meagre resources that it’s got. However, community media tells us something about the way forward. That the ownership of media needs to be with everyone and not just a few. People need to tell their own stories, recognising that our differences and our diversity are our strengths.