May 082015

This is a post I’ve held back from writing because I didn’t want it to sound tetchy and add a siren voice to the election campaign. But now that the result of the general election is history, I can say what I think more openly. Like that’s ever really bothered me you might rightly add!

I left the Labour Party last year and joined the Greens because I didn’t have any hope that the policy ideas being offered by Ed Miliband where adding up to a winning platform for Labour for the election.

While I hoped that Labour would come-up with the goods, I continually felt I wasn’t going to be satisfied. Instead, every time I looked at statements being made by the Green Party I found myself agreeing not only with the sentiment and the way it was expressed, but also the practical reality of what was being put forward. There was no prevarication, no coded messages, no empty aspirational gestures.

Instead, the policies of the Green Party were clear and forthright. I kept asking myself when would a policy I agreed with come out of the Labour Party? When would I see a distinctive campaign be launched that I could get behind and know that it would make a difference?

It never came.

What confirmed my decision to leave Labour was hearing Ed Miliband welcoming delegates at the Labour Party Conference and Manchester, by declaring the city a ‘Tory and Lib-Dem free zone.’ It was at that point that I knew that Ed Miliband was only going to try to appeal to the core vote of the Labour Party and wouldn’t bother to try to reach out to Conservative or Liberal Democrat voters.

I’d been disillusioned with Ed Balls for some time also, and for two reasons. Firstly he spent more time learning to play the piano and running marathons while he was shadow chancellor than he did crusading against the evils of inequality and for social justice; and secondly, as William Keegan in the Observer noted, Ed Balls u-turn on attacking austerity was a huge error.

As Keegan wrote in June 2013 “We now seem to be witnessing a collective failure of nerve. At just the moment when even the International Monetary Fund is owning up to having got it wrong, Labour, fearful of entering the next election campaign being pilloried as the spending party, gives the impression of being trapped in the headlights. And just for good measure, those highly respected independent thinktanks, the Institute for Fiscal Studies and the Institute for Government, have lamely accepted that it is going to be a case of “austerity, austerity, austerity” for the remainder of the decade.”

What was perfect ground for a coherent and clear economic policy, against austerity, instead got crowded out by an over-projection of personality and spin. As the result, as yesterday’s election proves, people saw right through Labour’s lack of policy.

There’s no point in opting for austerity-lite under Labour when you have George Osborne on hand to offer you a full-strength glug of masochistic austerity-max!

The Green Party is clear. Austerity sucks.

I’ve been a bystander in this election, the first time in twenty years of being politically active, as I need to finish off my PhD thesis, but once that is out of the way I’ll be stepping-up my support for Greens in Leicester and their rejection of this stupid form of economic flagellation.

By the way, when I was in the Labour Party I voted for the other Miliband – I bet a lot of people are now wishing they had as well.