Oct 072011
 
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I bought this when I was ten or eleven years old

The first week of teaching is always a challenge. It’s where the planning and the practice come into close proximity, nose up to one another, and then one of them emerges victorious after a grapple and a test of strength. At this point I feel that the planning won out, but I also have a mild state of anxiety that it was a case of holding on by the finger nails, and that if there was a gentle breeze in the direction of the radio modules this week, I would now be floating at the bottom of a dirty puddle like a plastic bag that has been whipped around a municipal park and is now laying discarded and forgotten.

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Me in 1978

But the week was good. It was great to meet the new Radio Production students, catch up with the returning students, and to run some sessions that got our minds thinking about the way that we can use radio. I have to say that the highlight of my week was playing Dr Who and the Pescatons to the first year radio production students. It was funny listening back to this audio drama after so long. I still have the album that I bought when I was ten or eleven years old. My eldest brother was into punk in 1977, and used his cash to buy Clash and Sex Pistols singles. I was a bit of a Dr Who fan and spent my money on albums by the BBC Radiophonic Workshop and Disaster Sound Effects albums. So at my lecture it was great hearing Tom Bakers voice on a high-end sound system, that brought out the tone and the character of his voice. Tom Baker’s voice sits alongside Roger Livesey and Richard Burton as my all-time favourite actors, solely based on their voices.

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Radio Production Course Development Mindmap

Later in the week I ran a session with the second year radio production students, as part of their personal tutoring sessions. Rather than just sit in a classroom, we worked in a computer lab and created personal mind-maps that asked what they think that they might be doing in two years time once the have graduated? After each person wrote a blog we sat and talked about how the BSc Radio Production & Technology course can be improved so that we see a more direct link between the course and industry, and how this can be developed to ease the transition from studying and employment for most of the graduates. We agreed that personality can only play a limited role, and that the rest would be dependent on having a set of distinctive skills and grabbing every opportunity there is to gain experience and undertake production work.

As ever there are some major challenges ahead in meeting the expectations of the students, but on the basis of this week it looks like being a good year.

Oct 042011
 

It was a very busy, intense but highly productive first couple of sessions for TECH3013 Advanced Radio Production. The lecture was very well attended, and there was a great buzz around the room as everyone settled in and tried to take-in the challenge that I laid out before them. How do we make great content for DemonFM with our partners and friends around the city.

There are three areas that learners will be working on in this module, which will provide an intense focus for the next twenty four weeks of activity and study. We will be working with the Leicester Comedy Festival, we will be promoting and developing the live music offer of DemonFM, and we will be championing arts and creativity in Leicester with the Cultural Quarter podcasts.

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Advanced Radio Production – Working Themes

To make things easier to manage, and to ensure that Simon Walsh and I have a good chance to work coherently with each of the groups, we have decided to divide the three tasks equally between each of the lab/workshop groups.

  • Monday – Cultural Quarter Podcasts (Rob Watson)
  • Thursday – Leicester Comedy Festival (Simon Walsh)
  • Friday – DemonFM Live Music Experience (Simon Walsh)

Each of these activities have a very ambitious aims that will demand a lot of attention from each of the learners who work on these groups, but what dividing them up in this way gives us, is a clear sense of cohesion within each group, so that a clear brief can be developed for each content area, and so that learners will be able to formalise their teams more clearly by following a theme through from start to finish.
This doesn’t mean that each area is exclusive, but it does mean that the main responsibility for producing content in these themes rests with the students who are timetabled for each of the groups. Unfortunately because we have so many students on the module, if someone wants to work in a different team, they will have to persuade someone else to swap with them.

I held my first lab session on Monday afternoon, where we all set-up our WordPress Blogs using the DMU commons system. I’m going to help Simon’s first group on Thursday and Friday, after which I’m expecting that everyone becomes autonomous bloggers, using this as a resource to account for the work that they undertake on the module, and then pooling that work as part of Radio@DMU.

We identified three key tasks to start with for the Cultural Quarter Podcasts. Learners agreed to dot he following for week two:

  • First, listen to a ‘culture’ or ‘art’ review radio programme and write a review about it on their new blog. This will be tagged TECH3013 so that we can share what each other thinks about culture based radio programmes.
  • Secondly, think of someone to interview who is doing something culturally interesting in Leicester, which we think that the DemonFM audience might be interested in hearing about.
  • Finally, can we list all of the types of activities that we think relate to culture in Leicester, and which will give us a broad view of the life of the city and what’s happening. It’s really important that we establish a set of links to other culture guides and ‘what’s-on’ so that we can start to figure out how to make this information appealing to the DemonFM audience, and so that we can start to move out of our comfort zones and experience a range of cultural activities far beyond those things that we have established in our own personal repertoire.

I’m really excited at the idea of leading the Cultural Quarter project for DemonFM, and hope to be producing some audio content myself. I think we will be able to range far-and-wide, and we are likely to have a great time in the process.

Oct 032011
 

Today I introduced a load of my students to the joys of blogging. Well when I say blogging, it was the starting point where we opened up the blogging application and figured out how to set the name of the site and to set up appropriate categories.

We are using WordPress hosted somewhat experimentally on the DMU Commons systems. The aim is to give staff and students alike a chance to share their thoughts and observations about the work that they do and the material that they are producing for their coursework. With any luck this will be a useful resource where learners can build a profile that can be recognised within the media industry where the great work that they do is seen and picked-up by people who are looking for talent and want to employ the next generation of technically savvy and smart media producers.

There’s a sense of apprehension so far about what they can write about, but I have a real feeling that once the learners get into their stride, and they start to gain some confidence after they have seen each others posts, I really think that there will be a buzz around the site.

We are aggregating the posts that are connected with radio production in one site at http:radio.our.dmu.ac.uk

WordPress is a very flexible site with the opportunity to install lots of plug-ins on the sites that you host for yourself. We have to restrict the level of plug-ins on this site because we are expecting so many people to use it. But Owen Williams who is hosting this site is very keen to add more plug-ins if there is a clear use and demand for them.

The syndication plug-in has been an interesting experience for me to get to grips with. It’s never straight-forward to adapt and change the setting, but I think I’ve now figured out how to add the individual RSS feeds from each of the blogs that my students produce and then tag with an appropriate category. It might not be the best way to do this, but it works for the moment. I’m not sure that a site like this is intended to host many hundreds of students work, but it’s worth having a go to see how far we can take it.

So, over the next couple of weeks and months, I’m looking forward to a whole host of interesting blogs to read, an explosion of social media feeds and posts, and a strong sense that we are all sharing our experience and learning from one another.

Sep 292011
 
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What Defines Professionalism?

There are many people in further and higher education who are struggling to instil into their media production and media studies learners the ethics and attitudes of professionalism. With courses of study that try to reflect the pressures of working life in different parts of the media industry, there is a focus on high-pressure experience, working to deadlines, managing complex projects and taking clear responsibility for the work that is produced and communicated.

Leading courses do as much as they can to emulate a professional business environment, with lots of contact between learners and people who have worked in the media industries and who know the day-to-day pressures of turning around media packages, websites, recordings, interviews, features, reports, and the whole plethora of items that a media business turns-out daily.

There is a good deal of thought around the idea of a professional built-in to our media courses. The idea that graduates will be ready for work and will almost without any transition or reorientation, be able to step into the world of daily deadlines, hierarchies and work-place political positioning, is prevalent.

However, learners are all to often only encouraged to assimilate a view of professionalism that is external to their experience. Professionalism in a course is often managed and signalled by association and accreditation. Does a course have the backing of such-and-such a professional body? Is the professional experience comparable with industry standards set by a group of (usually) men who went to university in the 1970s and 1980s?

But the world is not standing still. The techniques and tools of what it means to be a professional are changing. The first wave of change has been associated with the break-up of the means of production. The introduction of desk-top based media production applications and workstations meant that industry professionalism was no longer defined solely on the basis of your access to scares resources like studios and edit suits. The second wave has been the introduction of more social ways to communicate and discuss what happens when people who have jobs in the media industry do their thing. The rise of the insider-blog that tell the story of how a particular production is put together. The short film on a DVD that maps out what the stages are of a production on a movie in glorious detail. The tweets and messages of newspaper columnists arguing among themselves about the virtues of their work.

All of these open-up the process of media production and shows that it’s not just about having ‘insider-status’ but that being a media professional is about something else, something that is more personal, more focussed on crafting content in a creative, engaging manner, and less likely to be about regressive work-based hierarchies, closed-shops and restrictive working practices. We can assume more and more that the process of producing media is open to scrutiny and observation from the consumers of that media. The media industry is becoming a giant glass box, where all of the innards and workings are available to see. Where the magician is no longer solely behind the curtain pulling their levers and making their impressive noise.

So if things have changed, where does the mode of thinking that we positively associate with professionalism come from? How are individuals enabled and entitled to act with confidence and operate in an increasingly complex, converged and mixed-up media production environment? What are the values of the media professional that we can’t do without? Integrity? Capability? Imagination? Accountability? Deliver-ability?

Can these values be imposed from without? Can they be tested by examination after being learnt by rote? Or are they only capable of being learnt by experience? By being coached and supported in individuals who are asked to react to the world as it is now, not as it was defined in the days when the text-books where conceived?

I hope this is not a throw-the-baby-out-with-the-bathwater argument. Instead I think it’s worth discussing and thinking about what we mean by the idea of the media professional and what makes that relevant in an age of ubiquitous computing, social networking and a plentiful supply of the tools of media production? If we strip everything away that isn’t essential to the professional mindset, what are we left with? And if we’ve stripped everything away, do we need to start calling it something else?

Sep 212011
 

I’m reading Tim Crook’s excellent book Radio Drama, and its great to find out that the work that we are attempting in a very piecemeal manner with Audiotheque has already been given a go and achieved. Putting audio drama on the web and trying to appeal to an audience that is younger than the traditional BBC Radio 4 audience is nothing new then.

One thing that has changed since the mid 1990s when Independent Radio Drama Productions was established is the rise of social media. Commentators often like to call this Web 2.0. Personally, I regard it as exactly the same version of the internet that came out of the Xerox Palo Alto laboratories in the late 1960s. Computers talking to each other. Instead, we have use woken up to the idea that this is what computers do really well. They connect people in synchronous and asynchronous communication using a range of media forms, including visual, auditory, textual and interactive.

Anyway, one of the objectives of the review of the Audiotheque website that is slowly getting under-way at the moment, is the re-categorisation of the different types of content that the site wants to host and encourage users to share. These categories are going to be very important for users of the site to find their way around the site and understand the relationships between different types of content.

So the question is: what name do we give these categories?Should we stick with the tried and tested assumptions that drama is categorised as ‘Comedy’, ‘Tragedy’ or ‘Escapism’? Or should we attempt to redefine a set of categories that are more related to some other properties of the content? Tim Crook rightly identifies that “Sound drama in all its technical, literary and performance elements builds to create a phonic texture that depends on rhythm, imagination and the physical impact of the sound via the listener’s auditory perception” (Crook 1999: p.78).

Here there are six categories that intersect around the idea of ‘phonic texture’ and the listeners perceptions of these sounds:

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While I’m not suggesting that we use these particular categories, they do have a very strong logical sense, and would make the users and visitors to the Audiotheque site think about the range of categories that might be possible to construct. Tim Crook goes on to question the potential categories of organisation for audio drama by comparing sound with fine art:

“Does sound have line or contour? Linearity depends on a boundary of any two- or three-dimensional shape. Or does sound have a ‘masses’ quality? does it communicate in indeterminate patches of colour or sound rather than delineated and drawn shapes with clear contours and outlines? Does time determine the linearity of sound? Timing is fundamental to rhythm. The language of music is determined by time. It depends on a value of so many sounds to a second. So sound does have linearity and contour. Does it have mass? Sound can be expressed very effectively in indeterminate splashes and effusions of noise. Speech can be expressed without regular patterning. It does not have tone underscored by meter or rhythm” (Crook 1999: p.78).

When we think about audio drama in this light we can start to get a sense of the difficulty involved in structuring the categories and descriptive networks in which we place audio drama. Should we maintain a traditional approach based on genre and audience expectation? Or, can we come up with some new categories that might take us into new and interesting directions? What is certain is that many people have struggled with this taxicological conundrum. Perhaps the only starting place is it keep reading them and occasionally flag-up what they say for wider discussion.

Sep 202011
 
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Good Bye Old Friend

At the weekend I got rid of my television. I had a friend help me drive it to the tip, and we left it in a concrete bay waiting to be added to the pile of other televisions and electrical goods that form an ever-growing mountain of consumable home entertainment hardware. It’s not that there was even anything wrong with the set, except that it was big, took up a lot of room, had no built-in Freeview, was a CRT screen and was very, very easy to sit in front of for hours and watch absolute nonsense.

Nowadays a TV has to be slim, black and dominant in the house. A television isn’t something to be disguised in a wood effect casing as if it is a piece of the furniture. Instead, the television is expected to set the tone for the rest of the life that you lead. My now disposed of television had a silver plastic case with a glass-fronted stand for the VCR and set-top box. Each adding to the number of remote controls that proliferate in our living rooms.

It’s not that I dislike television as a medium either. Indeed I have many favourite shows, from Thirty Rock and The Big Bang Theory, to Dr Who and classic drama. I suppose the main reason for getting rid of the set is that I got bored with the stuff in-between. The talent shows, the medical dramas, the bake-offs, the grand-designs, and the limp, circular news programmes. If I thought for a moment that what I would be doing with the rest of my life was searching for something interesting to watch, and never finding anything, I know that I’d have died and gone to hell. Do I need to see one more talent-show wanna-be getting mocked and ridiculed for their lack of singing talent, when everyone who makes the show knows that they are a no-hope looser. Cruelty isn’t worth watching.

So instead, I’ve rearranged the living room so that my hi-fi speakers are placed in an equilateral triangle with my sofa, my DAB radio is patched in to a channel on the amp, and my old DVD player is a perfectly good way to play my CDs. I’ve got hundreds of books to get through. I have an open fire I can build and fall asleep in-front of when the chill autumn nights set in. Or, I can just go to be, catch up on much-needed sleep, and get on with doing things when the day starts and I’m feeling fresh.

I’ve lived without a television for a number of years before and didn’t have a problem. The real question is why did I get one again? What was the gap I was trying to paper over, and what should I do now that I have discovered this gap again and decided it’s a a lot more interesting to have a gap than to try to distract yourself. I’ll let you know how I get on. BBC Radio Three, here I come.

Sep 152011
 

DemonFM – Web Development Project

Draft Project Brief: To develop the website of www.demonfm.co.uk .

Number of Students Needed: Up to Six web developers

Outline: www.demonfm.co.uk is the website representing DemonFM, De Montfort Universities’ Community Radio Station. The station is a collaborative project between De Montfort University and De Montfort Students Union. The aim of the project is twofold:

  • To give volunteers at De Montfort University the opportunity to gain experience as radio broadcasters.
  • To represent the views and interests of young people across Leicester.

DemonFM’s online service aims to act as a social media hub for the collaboration, discussion and comment about the programmes and shows that are produced for the station. Using social media techniques, www.demonfm.co.uk allows contributors to share ideas, distribute their work online, and to experiment with new forms of radio programme making. The website presently uses Drupal as an open-source content management platform, which works by building pre-designed PHP modules that are developed through the Drupal Open Source project. The site also uses CivicRM as it’s contact management system, which allows the site managers to develop communications with members and to organise events and training sessions. Integrated with the site is a Media Wiki and a PHP Forum. The site streams simultaneous audio from the station, but otherwise uses Creative Commons licences for all media that is posted to the site.

What is Expected from Each Student: Developers will be asked to manager and improve the website for DemonFM, so that content producers, show teams, bloggers and journalists are able to distribute audio, video and text based media to the DemonFM audience. Development of the site will include ensuring that it operates in a robust, secure and scalable manner, while interconnecting with other forms of social media (such as Twitter, Facebook and Youtube) and other on-line systems, such as Icecast and Rivendell. The site is aimed at non-technical users, so a strong emphasis will be placed on usability and interface issues.

To What Standard will the Work be Produced:  Developers will be expected to manage the website in a professional way, using up-to-date and industry standard solutions, while innovating in the use of interactive social media functionality. Developers will be expected to represent De Montfort University in its capacity as an official partner of DemonFM. The University and Students Union have high expectations about the standard of work that enables DemonFM’s website to function, as this will be used to promote the project to an international audience of radio producers, journalists, music producers, record companies, students and members of the public.

What is the Time Frame: All production work to be completed by Easter 2012

What Skills are Required: An ability to manage a complex project. An ability to work as part of a team. An ability to overcome significant technical and production issues. An ability to talk with non-technical users to specify design issues. An ability to liaise with representatives of official organisations, sponsors, agents and other supporting bodies. An ability to write-up technical and editorial production plans and reports in detail.
To find out more information please contact Rob Watson by email rwatson@dmu.ac.uk or on 07817 720 688.

DemonFM Web Development Student Project 001 150911

Sep 152011
 

DemonFM – Social Media Development Project

Project Brief: To develop the Social Media Capability of www.demonfm.co.uk

Number of Students Needed: Up to Four developers

Outline: www.demonfm.co.uk is the website representing DemonFM, De Montfort Universities’ Community Radio Station. The station is a collaborative project between De Montfort University and De Montfort Students Union. The aim of the project is twofold:

  • To give volunteers at De Montfort University the opportunity to gain experience as radio broadcasters.
  • To represent the views and interests of young people across Leicester.

DemonFM’s online service aims to act as a social media hub for the collaboration, discussion and comment about the programmes and shows that are produced for the station. Using social media techniques, www.demonfm.co.uk allows contributors to share ideas, distribute their work online, and to experiment with new forms of radio programme making. The website presently uses Drupal as an open-source content management platform, which works by building pre-designed PHP modules that are developed through the Drupal Open Source project. The site also uses CivicRM as it’s contact management system, which allows the site managers to develop communications with members and to organise events and training sessions. Integrated with the site is a Media Wiki and a PHP Forum. The site streams simultaneous audio from the station, but otherwise uses Creative Commons licences for all media that is posted to the site.

What is Expected from Each Student: Developers will be asked to manager and improve the social media capability for www.demonfm.co.uk, so that contributors to the site are able to distribute audio media to new audiences. Development of the social media capability of the site will include ensuring that it interfaces in a robust, secure and scalable manner with a range of social media applications, such as Twitter, Facebook and Youtube. The site is aimed at non-technical users, so a strong emphasis will be placed on usability and interface issues.

To What Standard will the Work be Produced: Developers will be expected to manage the website in a professional way, using up-to-date and industry standard solutions, while innovating in the use of interactive social media functionality. Developers will be expected to represent De Montfort University in its capacity as an official partner of DemonFM. The University and Students Union have high expectations about the standard of work that enables DemonFM’s website to function, as this will be used to promote the project to an international audience of radio producers, journalists, music producers, record companies, students and members of the public.

What is the Time Frame: All production work to be completed by Easter 2012

What Skills are Required: An ability to manage a complex project. An ability to work as part of a team. An ability to overcome significant technical and production issues. An ability to talk with non-technical users to specify design issues. An ability to liaise with representatives of official organisations, sponsors, agents and other supporting bodies. An ability to write-up technical and editorial production plans and reports in detail.
To find out more information please contact Rob Watson by email rwatson@dmu.ac.uk or on 07817 720 688.

DemonFM Social Media Development Student Project 001 150911

Sep 152011
 

DemonFM – Content Development Project

Project Brief: To develop programming content for DemonFM

Number of Students Needed: Up to Twelve content producers

Outline: DemonFM is a community radio station run by volunteers from De Montfort University and broadcasting to young people in Leicester. The service is licensed by Ofcom and broadcast twenty four hours each day, all year. www.demonfm.co.uk is the website representing DemonFM, De Montfort Universities’ Community Radio Station. The station is a collaborative project between De Montfort University and De Montfort Students Union. The aim of the project is twofold:

  • To give volunteers at De Montfort University the opportunity to gain experience as radio broadcasters.
  • To represent the views and interests of young people across Leicester.

The main aim of the station is to represent the interests and talent of young people in Leicester, reflecting the diversity and different backgrounds that many listeners come from. The station has the aim to be innovative, professional and credible, while developing its services through collaboration, partnership and consensus. What is Expected from Each Student: Developers will be asked to manager and improve the broadcast output for DemonFM, so that content producers, show teams, bloggers and journalists are able to produce programmes of high quality. Content includes music, audio, video and text based media. The station promotes local music, creative arts, culture and events from around Leicester. Content producers will be able to work independently or as part of a team. The station is aimed at non-specialist audience, so a strong emphasis will be placed on entertainment, while also exploring and experimenting with ways to innovate in programme production, news, music production, on-air promotion and live events.

To What Standard will the Work be Produced: Content producers will be expected to manage content in a professional way, using up-to-date and industry standard solutions, while innovating in the use of interactive social media techniques. Content producers will be expected to represent De Montfort University in its capacity as an official partner of DemonFM. The University and Students Union have high expectations about the standard of work that enables DemonFM’s to function, as the station will be promoted to an international audience of radio producers, journalists, music producers, record companies, students and members of the public.

What is the Time Frame: All production work to be completed by Easter 2012

What Skills are Required: An ability to manage a complex project. An ability to work as part of a team. An ability to overcome significant technical and production issues. An ability to talk with non-technical users to specify design issues. An ability to liaise with representatives of official organisations, sponsors, agents and other supporting bodies. An ability to write-up technical and editorial production plans and reports in detail.

To find out more information please contact Rob Watson by email rwatson@dmu.ac.uk or on 07817 720 688.

DemonFM Content Development Student Project 001 150911

Sep 152011
 

Audiotheque – Web Development Project

Project Brief: To develop the website of www.audiotheque.co.uk .

Number of Students Needed: Up to Four students

Outline: www.audiotheque.co.uk is a collaborative project between De Montfort University and BBC Radio Drama. The aim of the project is twofold:

  • To introduce a new generation of producers to the experience of creating audio drama.
  • To introduce new, non-traditional listeners to audio drama.

Audiotheque aims to act as a social media hub for the collaboration, discussion and comment about the audio dramas produced for the site. Using social media techniques, Audiotheque allows contributors to share ideas, distribute their work online, and to experiment with new forms of audio drama. The website presently uses Drupal as an open-source content management platform, which works by building pre-designed php modules that are developed through the Drupal Open Source project. The site also uses CivicRM as it’s contact management system, which allows the site managers to develop communications with members and to organise events and training sessions. The site is presently being managed by David Watts, who is part of the DMU External Relations team.

What is Expected from Each Student: Developers will be asked to manager and improve the website for www.audiotheque.co.uk, so that content producers are able to distribute audio media to a new audiences. Development of the site will include ensuring that it operates in a robust, secure and scalable manner, while interconnecting with other forms of social media, such as Twitter, Facebook and Youtube. The site is aimed at non-technical users, so a strong emphasis will be placed on usability and interface issues.

To What Standard will the Work be Produced:  Developers will be expected to manage the website in a professional way, using up-to-date and industry standard solutions, while innovating in the use of interactive social media functionality. Developers will be expected to represent De Montfort University in its capacity as an official partner of BBC Radio Drama. BBC Radio Drama has high expectations about the standard of work that enables the Audiotheque website to function, as this will be used to promote the project to an international audience of drama producers, journalists, students and members of the public.

What is the Time Frame: All production work to be completed by Easter 2011

What Skills are Required: An ability to manage a complex project. An ability to work as part of a team. An ability to overcome significant technical and production issues. An ability to talk with non-technical users to specify design issues. An ability to liaise with representatives of official organisations, sponsors, agents and other supporting bodies. An ability to write-up technical and editorial production plans and reports in detail.

A positive outcome may result in a supportive statement from a senior BBC representative, and contacts within the BBC web development team.
 To find out more information please contact Rob Watson by email rwatson@dmu.ac.uk or on 07817 720 688.

Audiotheque Web Development Student Project 002 150911